PuertoRicoSportBike Association Forum
Inscribete y se parte de la familia de Puerto Rico Sportbike Association para que disfrutes y aprendas mas sobre este excitante deporte sobre dos ruedas.

Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Kawa636 on Thu Aug 21, 2008 7:09 pm

Hoy en la pista de Virginia motorsport habia unas clasesitas de track day para principiantes, gratis para los militares asi que me inscribi y me gusto,,,, quede hookeao.....asi que ya hay otra enfiebrao por aca, descubri que no es lo mismo en la calle que en la pista

empezamos con 2 hrs de clases y dimos como 4 vueltas a la pista para familiarizarnos con ella y descubri que no puedo lean la motora cuando viro hacia la derecha,me tranco, me da miedo y no puedo sacar las nalgas del asiento hacia la izquierda no tengo problema, puedo lean la motora bastante y me salgo del asiento bastante,....el instructor me dice tengo que practicar en un circulo hasta que coja confianza....

Anyway esto fue lo que cojimos en el salon de clase, ellos usan el Track day guide by Steve Bullimore

The Briefing:
During the briefing you will be introduced to the instructors and told how the sessions will be run etc.
You should be shown the flags that will be in use, what they mean and what you must do when they come out. Make sure you know your flags. You should be told about the condition of the track and any special features of the circuit about which you need to be aware. This includes how to join the track safely from the pitlane and where to leave the track when the sessions have finished.

Most trackday organisers run a series of sighting laps at the beginning of the sessions - you'll be told about these in the briefing. Usually its 3 laps at the start of the first few sessions following the instructors with no overtaking. You will be warned about the consequences of riding "dangerously", pulling wheelies, stopies, not obeying the marshals flags, speeding in the paddock area etc...

You will probably be told what to do in the event of someone crashing - which is do not to stop to help! Trained marshals are on hand to deal with fallen riders and you will simply cause more of a hazard and get in the way if you stop to help. Some briefings are very good, others not so. Be sure to ask if there is anything about which you are uncertain. Dont worry if it sounds like a stupid question, chances are there are others who are unsure as well.
Before the briefing starts you'll be asked to sign a disclaimer form ensuring the organisors will not be liable for any damages which may occur to you or your bike. If you have a family to support, consider taking out some life insurance, and updating your Will is a good idea as well.

2. Sighting Laps


Learn the geography of the course and control adrenalin levels

Sighting Laps: The first one or two sessions generally start with a number of slow sighting laps led by an instructor, usually wearing a flourescent bib. Put the bike in a suitable gear, perhaps 3rd or 4th and leave the gears alone. You can now concentrate on learning where the track goes.There is no overtaking during the sighting laps. In particular, note the location of the marshal's posts. They are there to warn you of hazards ahead.At the start of the session the Marshals usually show a green flag to indicate that the track is clear and to show/remind you of their location. Note the condition of the track. Cement dust is used to dress oil and fuel spills on the circuit and although safe, is best avoided.

When the sighting laps are complete you will be waved on... ...stay calm and continue at a steady pace! Dont go ballistic on the first free lap or you will almost certainly arrive at a bend faster than you can deal with, panic brake, run out of track and end up in the gravel. Build up speed slowly.

3. Staying out of trouble

Easy at first, concentrate fully and know when to rest...

Staying out of trouble: Remember you have all day, so take your time to learn your way around. Ease into the day and into each session gradually. Take care on cold tyres. The number of laps required to get your tyres up to temperature depends on many factors. In good conditions it will take at least two laps. If it is cold and/or wet, it could take many more.

You don't have to stay out for the full session. If you are getting tired or stiff, then come in. Fatigue reduces your ability to concentrate and you need to be fully switched on at all times. If you are tired you are more likely to make mistakes. Beware track-evenings - if you have been at work all day you won't be at your best. Also the limited amount of track time available on evening events often leads to people going too fast too soon and falling off. This is not only bad for your safety but eats into the already limited track time. You don't have to do every session so miss one if you want a break.

Beware the first session after lunch. If you've had a big lunch you may well be feeling lethargic and your reactions will be slower than normal. Its a good idea to eat small and often.

Concentrate only on what is in front of you. Trust other riders to pass you safely. If you are aware of a rider behind you do not alter your line to let them past. You may move into their path just as they attempt to pass. Aim for consistency, not speed. Use your familiar road riding style until you are comfortable with where you are going.

Trying to hang off the bike or get your knee down when you are not used to it will distract your attention from where you are going. Be patient, it will happen. You will make mistakes, so maintain a good safety margin.

Its a good practice to turn into corners later than you might at first think. This reduces the risk of you running out of track on the exit. Ride such that you are always relaxed and in control.

If you have a problem raise your left hand, slow down and keep to the outside of the track on your way back to the pits. If you need to cross the 'racing line' to do so you could just pull off the track and wait until the end of the session. Get behind the fence so that you are safe and so you will not distract other riders.

4. Passing / following another rider
Choose your move carefully...

Passing: Be aware of their position, but look 'through' them to the track ahead. They do not know you are there. You do not know their level of skill and experience. They may be experimenting with different lines. They may make a mistake. e.g. Change down one gear to many. Loose the front, Out brake themselves etc. You may make a mistake. e.g. Change down one gear to many. Misjudge your speed, out brake yourself etc Their safety is in your hands.

Suddenly appearing alongside may make them sit up, or brake mid-corner. The safest place to pass is on the straights. Getting good drive out of a bend allows you to pass safely on the exit. To pass safely on the inside going into a turn you need to be ahead before you reach your braking area. This gives you both time to adjust your speed and line accordingly. If in doubt, don't. Let them go, find some space and carry on.

5. Learning the circuit
Know your braking, entry and apex points...

Learning the circuit: Remember you are aiming for consistency so count your gears so you know which gear you are in for each turn. Aim to get your gear changes consistent lap and lap. Once you have this baseline you can alter your gears as you get faster during the day.

Find reference points for each bend on the circuit. Braking, entry and apex are the most important. If there are cones out, use them. If not, ask the organisers to put some out. The cones will usually mark turn-in and apex points. Get as close to them as you can and be as accurate as you can. You will learn faster if you ask the instructors to show you round
6. What if it rains?
Wet conditions: be smooth and accurate

Rainy conditions: Dont go home! Riding in the wet is a good opportunity to learn and boost your confidence. Its a great time to practice accurate lines and being smooth with the brakes as well as the throttle.

When riding in the wet try and aim to get on the throttle as early as you can through the corners. Driving through on a positive throttle will load the rear wheel and unload the front. You stand a much better chance of saving a rear end slide than a front wheel slide!

Using all of the track will maximise your corner speed for a given lean angle so its good to be accurate with your lines - However, avoid at all costs white lines and curbs which are extremely slippery in the wet. A good thing about wet trackdays is that usually a lot of riders pack up and go home leaving those that stay with loads of space on the track and even more tracktime if the number of groups is reduced. Also, its a surprising fact that when its wet hardly anyone ever crashes so there are very few stoppages.

7. Your bike and your gear
Prepare the bike and yourself for the demanding conditions...

Bike and Gear: As a precaution, remove anything from the bike that you dont need, or that you wouldn't want to get broken or lost in gravel trap. You will not need your mirrors and removing them reduces the risk of bending the stay and cracking the top-cowel and screen if the bike ends up on it's ear. Cable ties are very good for fastening the top-cowel to the stay. Mirrors, indicator lights, the number-plate and tax disk are easy to remove and replace.

Remember to empty your luggage compartment. Before going out on the circuit tape up any 'glass' items left on the bike. Switch off your lights. They can distract other riders and the tape adhesive will cook onto the lense and be very difficult to remove. Check for loose nuts, bolts and other fasteners.

Tyres, brake disks and pads all wear at an increased rate on the track so make sure they will last the day. It is a good idea to check your tyres pressures. Some people reduce them slightly for trackdays, but the important thing is to make sure they are close to the recommended pressures.

Fuel up before entering the circuit. You will probably need to get fuel again at lunch time. Remember to stick your number plate back on and untape your lights before going back on the road. You will need to tape them up again before you go back out on the circuit.

If you have a race can, check if there are any noise limits in force at the circuit on that day. Make sure your gear is in good nick.

Some organisers will check but it is in your interests. Empty your pockets and take off any jewelry. Consider merrits of a back protector. At the end of they day replace anything you have taken off the bike (particularly your number plate) and remove any tape before you go back on the road. Don't forget to switch your headlight back on.
Its a good idea to service your bike a day or two before you head off on your track day. You'll need to ensure your bike is up to the demanding conditions of a track day and allow for the considerable rates of wear your tyres, disks and brake pads will under go.

Transporting your bike to the track by trailer or van is a good idea and will mean you'll be able to get the bike home if things get bent, bashed or go bang.

8. If the sh*t hits the fan...

Low siding is considered and honourable way to bin it...

If sh*t hits the fan: You arrive at a corner too fast and dont think you'll make it. What do you do? If you can, try and avoid just holding onto the brakes looking at the gravel trap! You will just end up in there and if you do you will fall off. Try and let go of the brake, look into the turn and throw it in. You will probably get round and if you don't it is better to low side.

9. Know your flags

Flag communications are vital...

Green - All clear. Used at the start of the session to indicate the track ahead is clear and possibly after a yellow flag has been shown.

Red & Yellow Striped - Caution Slippery Surface. E.g. It has started raining, or you are approaching a freshly dressed oil spill or there could even be bike debris on the track. Caution.

Static Yellow - Off track hazard. E.g. Someone has run-off and is stopped at the side of the track. They may about to rejoin the circuit. Slow down. No Passing. Continue to circulate until a green flag is shown to indicate that the hazard has been passed.

Waved Yellow - On track hazard. E.g. Someone has had a mechanical problem and is touring back to the pits. Slow down and be prepared to stop. No Passing.

Red - The session has been stopped because of a more serious incident. Slow right down and continue to circulate until you reach the track exit point then leave the track as instructed in the briefing. You may encounter bikes, riders, debris, oil or an emergency vehicle on the track so take extreme care. If you passed a fallen rider don't assume that the track ahead is safe. It is possible that there is another hazard up ahead

Black - Shown at the Start/Finish Line. The flag will be shown and the marshal will point at you or maybe hold out a board with your number on it. It could be that the Marshals are so impressed with your riding that they want to discuss it with you in person. Alternatively they may have spotted a potentially dangerous fault with your bike e.g. it could be leaking oil all over your back tyre. Either way you should slow down and return directly to the Pits to find out whats up.

Chequered - End of Session. Start your slowing down lap and return to the pits. It is surprising how many incidents happen when the chequered flag is shown, so take special care. You might use this lap to let your bike cool down, rather than switching it off while it is red hot.

Kawa636
Bacalao
Bacalao

Posts : 63
Join date : 2008-07-22

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Yamazuki on Thu Aug 21, 2008 7:45 pm

descubri que no puedo lean la motora cuando viro hacia la derecha,me tranco, me da miedo y no puedo sacar las nalgas del asiento hacia la izquierda no tengo problema, puedo lean la motora bastante y me salgo del asiento bastante

Bienvenido al mundo de los seres humanos! cheers

Casi todo el mundo tiene exactamente el mismo problema.Cuando dejo de practicar por mucho tiempo tambien me pasa.Yo no soy un experto pero a mi me ha funcionado el "kiss the mirror"

Al virar a la izq estoy en perfecta postura, al virar a la derecha,hmmm.... el espejo estaba mas lejos...hmmm...entonces me doy cuenta que estoy atravesao en la motora, no respetando la simetría bilateral.
Siempre la jodía postura!
La respuesta?

practice practice practice and then


yep...



practice!

BTW tremendo articulo y lo voy a adoptar para que los muchachos lo lean, esta bieeenn cabron! bounce

_________________
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Yamazuki
Admin

Posts : 4276
Join date : 2008-07-20
Age : 52
Motora : I'm a moving target,don't even try!

http://puertoricosportbike.forosactivos.net

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Kawa636 on Thu Aug 21, 2008 8:30 pm

gracias por la explicacion,,, ya yo habia pensado que estaba desalineado o algo asi Very Happy Very Happy
ahora a practicar...practicar...practicar...practicar...practicar...practicar... y al final mas practicas

a y dejame decirte que como me habias dicho la Kawa 636 se mueve bien ,, y se siente bien livianita cuando cojes las curvas gracias nuevamente por tus consejos...

Kawa636
Bacalao
Bacalao

Posts : 63
Join date : 2008-07-22

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Javielo on Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:02 pm

Jose tremendo articulo!!! gracias por postearlo, esto del track day juquea a uno y como todo practica y practica y mas practica hasta ganar mas confianza en la motora, las gomas y en uno mismo.

Javielo
Senior Bacalao
Senior Bacalao

Posts : 991
Join date : 2008-07-20

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Richard "GSX-R Boy" on Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:01 am

Mira que facil, mira abajo de este escrito y mira la confianza con la que pongo la rodilla en el piso casi a cualquier velocidad y lo facil que se me hace. Como dice el Yama, nos pasa a muchos. No me pidas que lo haga hacia la derecha con la misma confianza, por que no sera asi (todavia). Cuando lo practico, pues va saliendo solito. Pero cuando no lo hago en un tiempo, tengo que trabajarlo. La solucion, practica, practica, practica, y mucha mas practica, como dicen alla, seat time, seat time, seat time. Creeme que te saldra bien.

_________________
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Richard "GSX-R Boy"
Admin

Posts : 3598
Join date : 2008-07-21
Motora : Suzuki

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by CARLY- RR on Fri Aug 22, 2008 9:48 am

DIABLOS!! NO SE PQ SERA AQUI ESTAMOS TOS "TILTIAOS" ME PASO LO MIMSO Q YAMA Y RICHARD MIS CURVAS A LA IZQ. SON MAS RAPIDAS QUE A LA DERECHA PQ DIABLOS? NO SE, PERO EN ESTOS ULTIMOS DIAS Q ME FUI PAL TRAMITO A PRACTICAL LE METI MAS INTERES A LAS CURVAS A LA DERECHA CON UNOS TIPS QUE ME DIO RICHARD PUDE VER UN POCO DE MEJORIA EN LA POSTURA PERO LAS CURVAS NO SON TAN RAPIDAS COMO PARA IZQ. PERO EN ESAS ESTOY EN PRACTICAR, PRACTICAR Y PRACTICAR..... CREO Q NECESITAMOS ALINIAMIENTO PA LA DERECHA Arrow Arrow Arrow .... Laughing Laughing Laughing

CARLY- RR
Senior Bacalao
Senior Bacalao

Posts : 794
Join date : 2008-07-22
Age : 37

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Yamazuki on Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:29 pm

Bueno,yo creo que tiene mucho que ver el asunto de que la mano derecha es la que controla el cabillo y cuando uno esta saliendose a la izq el brazo derecho esta estirado casi y jalando mientras al virar a la derecha el brazo esta contraído y el cerebro nesesita mayor atencion hacia ese lado para poder controlar el cabillo apropiadamente.Seria interesante ver con los zurdos del foro a ver si les pasa lo mismo.Tambien ,el ser humano tiende a favorecer un lado naturalmente.

En todo caso,yo pensaría que lo mejor es practicar conscientemente el viraje a la derecha,tratando siempre de que tu cabeza quede en la misma posicion relativa que cuando viras a la izq, pero en el lado derecho. A mi se me hace conveniente calibrar la posicion de observando el espejo retrovisor y tratando de que la cara me quede mas o menos a la misma distancia.

_________________
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Yamazuki
Admin

Posts : 4276
Join date : 2008-07-20
Age : 52
Motora : I'm a moving target,don't even try!

http://puertoricosportbike.forosactivos.net

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Nando on Fri Aug 22, 2008 2:22 pm

scratch yo soy surdo y me pasa lo mismo aunque cuando cojo curvas a la derecha me siento un poco incomodo pero no tanto pero estuve hablando con un panita y me dijo lo mismo que dice Yama sobre el cabillo!!! eso se overcome practicando y pues si te caes analiza por que te caiste y modifica y vuelve hacerlo hasta q te salga!

Nando
Senior Bacalao
Senior Bacalao

Posts : 579
Join date : 2008-07-21

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Fmaymi on Fri Aug 22, 2008 6:09 pm

A mi me ha ayudado la practica en Sabana Seca asis que los quiero ver practicando Very Happy conmigo!!!

Fmaymi
Senior Bacalao
Senior Bacalao

Posts : 749
Join date : 2008-07-30
Age : 52
Motora : Honda

Back to top Go down

Re: Pido ayuda a los corredores expertos del foro

Post by Sponsored content Today at 8:55 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum